Pokemon Fangame Critique

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GorillaGamer
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Re: Pokemon Fangame Critique

Post by GorillaGamer » Thu Aug 03, 2017 1:31 am

Creating a sequel for a critically acclaimed game is not the easiest thing in the world. On top of updating the graphics to make the sequel look more visually appealing to the eye, you also have to make sure that the game has the core elements of the original that the fans enjoyed, you also got to add in new features in order to make it more like a new game and not just some glorified DLC. Such a thing is also prevalent in the world of Pokémon fangames.

You may remember how I reviewed Pokémon Sweet a few weeks ago; well I got around to play the sequel to the game, and let me tell you, I DO NOT recommend it at all. That comment in the Sweet review I made about giving the sequel a try? Disregard it and pretend that it doesn’t exist. It’s such a shame because I really enjoyed the first one and was hoping that the second one would be just as, if not better than the original.

Not that everything in Sweet 2th is terrible, mind you. The strongest aspect of the Sweet games has always been the custom sprites, and Sweet 2th manages to hit a grand slam in that area. The Pokédex doesn’t have all 802 Pokémon like the rumours claim, but it still have a large variety of sweets to choose from. The original 151 Pokésweets make a comeback in the game, and are joined by an extra 200+ sweets. There’s Minecko, which is a lime green and red mint flavoured Treecko. Nanadile, which is a banana flavoured Totodile. And then there’s Suckler, a lemon-drop Kingler with the best name in the game. All of the previously mentioned sweets are amazing, but the best ones by far would have to be the reskins for Groudon, Kyogre and Rayquaza. The amount of detail put into them is mind-boggling and the artists should be proud of themselves for all their hard effort.

Sweet 2th also has a few additions that I found rather neat. The big one is that depending on what starter Pokésweet you chose, the path you take at the beginning is dramatically different. Like in the first game, you can pick from Brownisaur, Strawmander and Squirpie, each one being able to use a HM move outside of battle. Brownisaur can cut down the small trees on the route east of the player’s hometown, Strawmander can push the boulder on the northern route, and Squirpie can surf on the water on the southern route. The concept itself is interesting, however the execution is quite flawed, which I’ll go into detail about later. Another interesting mechanic is that when a Pokésweet breaks out of a Pokéball, the Pokéball doesn’t get used up. It makes capturing legendries easier since you don’t have to spend a lot of money to stock up on Ultra Balls, but it comes at the cost of Pokéballs being slightly more expensive than usual. The final thing of note is that there’s a lot of side quests in the game. However they all boil down to exchanging an item for a handful of berries, which isn’t that bad since berries can be used to make some potent healing items.

Now let’s get into the negative aspects of the game, and believe me, there’s a lot of them. Let’s start out with the story, if you could even call it that. The first Sweet game had a rather basic story, but it worked well in the context of the game. Sweet 2th’s story can be summed up as “Your rival has gone insane and has stolen all the Mega Sweets in order to call out and capture the legendary Pokésweets.” It’s not very engaging, and at times I even forgot that there was a story at all. And that comment about the Mega Sweets, turns out that the game does incorporate Mega Evolution, however you’ll have little need to use it, because the difficulty of the game is so awkward.

Let me explain it in the best way I can; The start of the game is obnoxiously hard with opponents having Pokésweets at around level 20, when you’ll have level 12-16 Pokésweets. Once you do some grinding and surpass the level jump, the game becomes insultingly easy, especially since the levels of the Gym Leaders on the other paths don’t scale up as you progress through the game. That means that once you’re done with your path, you can go through the other paths to the areas that you missed. Those level 20 Pokésweets won’t be much hassle for your level 35-40 Pokésweets. All this is due to the whole process of having your starter decide which path you go down first. It’s a neat idea, but it completely screws up whatever challenge the game attempted to throw at you. The only other moment of bullshit was during the final battle of the main story line, where you rival will have SIX Mega Evolved Pokésweets, while you can only have one Mega Pokésweet. That’s not challenging, that’s a fucking cheap attempt at making a boss challenging. It doesn’t help that your rival has some of the best non-legendary Mega Evolutions in their team.

Then there’s the lack of variety on the different paths. On all three of them, you can expect to battle a group of bandits attempting to find a Mega Sweet for their boss, only to get creamed by the player. Not only does it scream laziness, but it goes to show that this whole alternate path thing should have been taken out of the game. The Gyms in the game, referred to as Battle Bakeries are another thing entirely. The main gimmick is that you can’t go out to heal your Pokémon, otherwise the trainers inside would heal, and you need to defeat them all to be able to battle the Gym Leader. Once you defeat the Gym Leader, they’ll give you a badge and state that you can re-battle them anytime you want. This makes grinding almost trivial and again, makes the game a lot easier than it should.

But the cherry on top of this shit-sundae is that Sweet 2th is one of the glitchiest games I’ve ever played. It’s a wonder that people haven’t referred to it as the Sonic 06 of Pokémon fangames, because the game’s borderline broken. Oh it can function alright, but be prepared to have the music glitch out everytime you exit a Pokémon Center. There’s glitches that causes the tiles to change colours, there’s glitches that causes the player character to get stuck on the scenery, and then there’s glitches that causes the game to freeze up and crash. A rather bothersome glitch is how the game fails to recognise that you’ve obtained the Coin Case, causing you to get locked out of the Game Corner and a few of the side quests. The worst glitch occurs in the postgame where if you enter a room that houses a Legendary Pokésweet, you can’t go out of the room. Not even an Escape Rope or the use of Dig/Teleport can save your sorry ass. The only way you can get out is if all your Pokésweets get knocked out, forcing you to escape to the nearest Pokémon Center. The Legendary Pokémon do respawn infinitely so there’s that little mercy, but it’s no excuse to ignore such a catastrophic bug like that.

I cannot recommend the game at the end of the day, which absolutely hurts me. I wanted to sit here and tell you all about how Pokémon Sweet 2th is an amazing game, but I can’t. The game starts out absurdly hard and becomes too easy later on, the story is non-existent, and the glitches ruin the game. You’re better off playing the original Pokémon Sweet, because this is one case where I’m not in the mood for a second serving.

Pros:
• The newly added Pokésweets look amazing.
• The unbreakable Pokéballs and the side quests were a neat idea.

Cons:
• The story is a whole load of nothing.
• The alternate paths were poorly implemented and made the game a lot easier than it should.
• The start of the game was obnoxiously hard.
• There’s too many damn glitches.

Final score: 3 N’s out of 10

Inspired by Andrew in Steamland.
Jesus man what is up with you and all of those waifus! Are you secretly the "Ultimate Pimp"?
An old quote from Project PATREON.

KingMan
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Re: Pokemon Fangame Critique

Post by KingMan » Thu Aug 03, 2017 11:16 pm

I like the alternate routes concepts, but I think the only way they could work in an official Pokémon game would be to have the gyms in those routes have an elemental advantage to your starter, similar to what Black & White did with the Striaton Gym.

Also, it boggles my mind that the sequels sucks so much ass. Assuming the game uses the same engine and was made by the same guys, you'd think they would have avoided those mistakes.

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GorillaGamer
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Re: Pokemon Fangame Critique

Post by GorillaGamer » Mon Aug 07, 2017 8:37 am

If there’s one thing the internet is known for, it’s that there’s a lot of memes floating about. Every day some innocuous thing gets warped into a meme and proceeds to get thrashed within a few weeks, to the point where you’ll wish it never existed. Pokémon fangames are not immune to the power of memes, thus lead to the creation of Pokémon Clover. The game was created by a team of users on 4Chan, led by the aptly named CloverCamerupt, and boasts a Pokédex made up of over 350 Fakémon. It also runs off an upgraded version of the Fire Red/Leaf Green engine that has the physical/special split present, as well as also having the Fairy type present. And as you’d expect from a Pokémon game created by the fine folk over at 4Chan, the game is riddled with memes and offensive caricatures. And where else but to start with the Pokémon themselves.

Now where do I begin? How about KuKlux, the Pokémon based off of the Ku Klux Klan? Or SJWhale, a hideous whale Pokemon that takes the piss out of SJW’s? Perhaps I should talk about Arabomb, the Fire type starter that resembles an Islamic suicide bomber? My favorite would have to be Derptato, which is literally a retarded potato. If there’s a demographic out there that gets offended, then there’s most likely a Pokémon to mock said demographic.

And how about those meme Pokémon? We got Anonymouse, a black mouse with a cape, fedora and the V for Vendetta mask that’s commonly associated with Anonymous. Then there’s Nauseon and its evolutions which are loosely based off of the Ebola outbreak which occurred in 2016. We’ve also got Mudslacks, a blue hedgehog wearing shit-stained pants that’s supposedly a reference to the Sonic the Hedgehog fandom. And how could I forget about Demiwaifu, a Pokémon that’s a combination from actual Pokémon often referred to as Waifumons (Gardevoir, Lopunny, Florges etc.) In fact the only Pokémon line that looks like it came from an actual Pokémon game is the Frosowl line, an Ice-Flying owl Pokémon that looks pretty darn great.

The Pokedex isn’t the only place where memes and offensive caricatures run rampant. The trainer classes you come across in the game poke fun at Bronies, furries, Jews, feminists, skinheads, men into the ‘Bara’ genre, alien believers from the History Channel, Mexican immigrants, weed users, and many more. In fact the only person safe from the game’s clutches is Donald Trump, and that’s because the game was completed before he was elected President of the United States. I’ll admit that I’m quite curious what a Trump Pokémon would look like, if I say so myself. And before you ask, I'm not talking about the Yungoose line that debuted in Sun and Moon.

Now let’s talk about some of the characters, and boy are they special. We’ve got the main rival Edgie, a grumpy teenage boy sporting an all-black outfit, including a matching fedora, who wouldn’t look out of place in Pokémon Reborn. Then we’ve got the Gym Leaders, who include a caricature of Tumblr SJW’s, a mortality ill Kanye West, and even the ghost of Freddie Mercury himself. The main antagonists of the game are an organisation known as Team Karma, based off of the website Reddit, who are led by a young lass known as Kymmi, who’s the anime girl mascot of the site, Know Your Meme, and potential waifu bait for the player. The in game story is nothing too special, you just collect badges while thwarting whatever Team Karma’s plans are. The one good thing is that Pokémon Clover doesn’t attempt and fail to make an overly edgy story, since it wouldn’t mesh well with the humor of the game.

Now let’s get into the gameplay of Pokémon Clover and let me tell you, it’s hard. It’s not like Naturia where you’re crippled by poor gameplay design; the game’s beatable, but it is NOT an easy task. The first thing you’ll see is that the levels of the Trainers Pokémon are slightly higher than their FR/LG counter parts. For example, the first Gym Leader will have level 13-16 Pokémon, as opposed to the 12-14 Pokémon in FR/LG. There’s never a point where the levels skyrocket, with the exception of a few side quests that are out of the way. Another part of the difficulty is remembering the typing for all of the Pokémon in the game. There’s a few images that has all the Pokémon and their types, floating around the internet, so there’s a little mercy for you all. The routes are also fairly long and are filled with lots of trainers, which makes travelling by foot a bit of a chore. However, there are a few moments in the game which are absolute bullshit, one of those being a sudden encounter with an asshole at the end of Victory Road, who has a full team of six Motherfucks, a fusion of Graveler, Tentacool and Golbat. These Pokémon were designed to be annoying and will spam Explosion, which the trainer will take advantage of. Unless you have a Pokémon with great physical Defense to take the hits, you’re going to get blown away and will be forced to go all the way through Victory Road. Oh and you also can’t use any items at all for this one fight, just figured I should let you know.

Now let’s talk about the graphics and the music for the game. The graphics look quite nice and can clearly depict whatever the game’s poking fun at. A lot of the designs for the Pokémon look great, whether you deem them offensive or not. The custom music for the game is also quite nice, with several of the tracks being quite catchy. A special mention goes to the Gym Leader theme, which is a remix of Sandstorm by Darude. As for the game itself, it’s relatively glitch free, which after playing the half-baked mess called Sweet 2th, is a breath of fresh air.

Overall, Pokémon Clover is a solid game. Even if you don’t care for the game’s style of humor, it’s still got some great gameplay to its name. And while it’s a joke game like Pokémon Snakewood, Clover isn’t a steaming pile of snake shit. I highly recommend this game to everyone except those who get easily offended. But then again, those that do get offended are the ones who most likely jerk off to Demiwaifu x Kymmi fanart. I'm just glad the game wasn't made by the people over at Something Awful, otherwise I would have been charged ten bucks just to download the game.

Pros:
• Boasts a Pokédex of 350+ Fakémon who have had a great amount of care put into their design.
• Offers a challenging but fair game.
• Has some humor that isn’t afraid to pull any punches.
• Demiwaifu is best girl

Cons:
• Has a few moments where the game throws some bullshit at us (Looking at you, trainer with six Motherfucks)
• The story is nothing special.

Final Score: 9 N’s out of 10.

Inspired by Andrew in Steamland.
Jesus man what is up with you and all of those waifus! Are you secretly the "Ultimate Pimp"?
An old quote from Project PATREON.

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GorillaGamer
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Re: Pokemon Fangame Critique

Post by GorillaGamer » Tue Aug 08, 2017 10:46 pm

There’s a few websites out there, where you fused the sprites of two different Pokémon to create an entirely new species of Pokémon. It’s a rather neat concept that reminds me of Fusion Summoning from the Yu-Gi-Oh card game. Now why am I talking about this? Because there exists a fangame that takes the concept of Pokémon Fusion and plays around with it, known as Pokémon Fusion Generation. The concept of Pokémon Fusion is simple; you go around and catch Pokémon, and bring them over to Bill’s house in order to fuse them into a stronger Pokémon. With such an interesting concept to build a game around, you’d think that Fusion Generation would be an amazing game. Unfortunately, it’s anything but.

Now I’m not saying that the game is complete garbage, it’s just average at best, and sub-par at worst. Before we point out the negative aspects of the game, it’s important to highlight the positives first; starting with the Fusionmons. The Fusionmons look very impressive; while most of the Pokémon Fusion sites slap the face of Pokémon 1 onto the body of Pokémon 2, Fusion Generation goes a step further and actually mixes up the Pokémon to conjure up some rather creative creatures. And the concepts for the Fusions are rather unique. Want to mix up Hitmonchan with Ninjask? How about Gyarados and Milotic? Perhaps you want something simple, like a fusion made from Beedrill and Aipom? Or even a combination of Salamence and Dragonite to create a terrifying engine of destruction. And they don’t stop there, oh no they don’t! There’s a fusion between Meganium and Houndoom, a fusion between Zoroark and Rhydon, a fusion between Mewtwo and Charizard, and even a fusion between Venusaur and Blastoise as a little shout out to the Pokémon Anime. There’s over 100 Fusions for you to discover and play around with in the game.

However the Fusion sprites are the highlight of the game, because the rest of the game is essentially a mediocre clone of the amazing FR/LG. In the games defense, the rest of the game looks amazing, with the bright colours adding some life to the otherwise empty region. The music in the game is also quite nice to listen to, taking various tracks from FR/LG, R/S/E and even D/P/Pt. The game was created before X and Y came out, so the Fairy type doesn’t exist in the game as well as the Physical/Special split being present in the game. I wish I could say more good things about the game, but it’s just so empty.

So now let’s talk about the negatives, and boy are there some real big flaws in the game. Let’s start things off with the story, because it’s a pivotal part of the game. I’ll give the creator some credit in that they attempted to create an engaging story in the vein of Black and White, but it falls flat on its face. The game is a sequel to R/S/E based in Kanto, and puts you in the shoes of Brendan/May depending on whether you’re a boy or a girl. Now it should be noted that you start out with a level 80 Rayquaza that can tear unsuspecting trainers a new asshole, however you’re forced to surrender it to Professor Oak, citing that it gives the player an unfair advantage, and allows you to choose from Bulbasaur, Charmander and Squirtle. Once you get given your choice of starter, Oak tells you that Pokémon Researcher Bill has created something that would revolutionise Pokémon battling for good.

Once you rescue Bill from a wild Beedrill in Viridian Forest, he will proceeded to introduce the player to the concept of Pokémon Fusion and even has a demonstration battle to showcase the power of his Fusionmon in front of a large crowd. Everyone starts supporting Bill and demands him to make a Fusionmon for them. However an elderly gentleman decries Pokémon Fusion as a crime against nature and scolds Bill for his actions, much to the displeasure of the crowd. A while later, you meet Bill at his home where he goes on to explain his desire to destroy the fusion machine. However, the remnants of Team Magma and Team Aqua join forces to steal the fusion machine and begin their goal of creating an army of Fusionmons to conquer all of Kanto. The player embarks on a quest to defeat Team Maqua and liberate all of the Fusionmons. And it’s here that the story starts to fall apart.

Firstly, it took the negative comments of one man to make Bill backpedal on the entire concept of Pokémon Fusion. Even though everyone else was clapping their feet over the idea, this one nameless person was enough to have Bill throw away years’ worth of research. Then there’s the idea of Pokémon Fusion being this inherently evil thing, with the narrative shaming the Gym Leaders/Elite 4/Team Maqua for using the fused Pokémon. Yet it’s possible for the player’s entire team to be consisted of Fusionmons. And considering how much stronger the Fusionmons are than their non-fused counterparts, why wouldn’t you use them? Speaking of Pokémon Fusions, you can’t make your own Fusionmons until after completing the main storyline. The only way to get them is by defeating the Gym Leaders and having them give their Fusionmon to the player. Defeating a Gym Leader also unlocks the ability to capture another Fusionmon that was used by the regular trainers in the Gym. The fact that the main selling point of the game is locked from the player until post-game is a really stupid decision. Oh and the leader of Team Maqua isn’t a fusion between Maxie and Archie, since that would make too much sense. The main antagonist of the game, I kid you not, is Wally. His reason for creating Team Maqua is that he got butthurt that the player left for Kanto without bringing him along.

Another negative part of the game is that it’s too easy. In fact I’d go so far as to say that it’s EASIER than X and Y. Why? The Fusionmons make the game an absolute cakewalk. Not only do they have higher stats than their non-fused counterparts and can learn all the good moves from both Pokémon, since you get them from the Gym Leaders, the game acts as if they’ve been traded over to you and receive a boost in Exp. Gained from battle. It’s quite easy to have your Fusionmons get over levelled and dominate any and all opposition with ease. For all my criticism towards fangames that throw in absurd bullshit in an attempt to challenge the player, having a game be too easy is just as, if not worse than that.

The game is also quite empty. Several parts of Kanto such as Mt Moon, the Celadon City Game Corner, and the massive route connecting Lavender Town to Fuchsia City have been cut out of the game. You do get to visit the Johto region in the postgame, but there’s very little to do there since half of the region has been taken out. The only thing to do after beating the game is to train up Pokémon and fuse them, and even that is a hassle. There are lots of NPC’s that offer to trade a Kanto Pokémon for a Pokémon not native to the region, which isn’t a bad thing since a lot of non-Kanto Pokémon are required to create some of the more powerful Fusionmons. The kicker is that some of the NPC’s will allow you to choose from two Pokémon, with one of choices being unable to be part of a Fusionmon. Choose the wrong Pokémon and you’ll get locked out of creating a couple of Fusionmons.

Pokémon Fusion Generation is a strange case to me. On one hand it has a rather intriguing premise and manages to flesh it out in a way that encourages players to keep on playing. But on the other hand, it’s filled with baffling choices that are a detriment to the game. The stupidest decision was locking the player out of creating their own Fusionmon until the postgame, as it hurts team diversity and discourages multiple play throughs. There’s very little information about the game on the internet, with the only noteworthy thing being a proposed plan for a sequel that was cancelled because Nintendo pressed copyright claims on the developers. If the premise captures your interest enough, than I recommend downloading the game, otherwise I’d recommend skipping the game and stick to playing FR/LG.

Pros:
• The concept of fusing two Pokémon together is intriguing, and the sprites for the Fusionmons look well done.

Cons:
• The story attempts to present a moral argument, but fails at doing so.
• Kanto feels so empty and lifeless in this game.
• The difficulty is too easy, due to how overpowered the Fusionmons are.

Final score: 4 N’s out of 10

Inspired by Andrew in Steamland.
Jesus man what is up with you and all of those waifus! Are you secretly the "Ultimate Pimp"?
An old quote from Project PATREON.

KingMan
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Re: Pokemon Fangame Critique

Post by KingMan » Tue Aug 08, 2017 11:11 pm

Is Weepinduo one of the fusions?

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GorillaGamer
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Re: Pokemon Fangame Critique

Post by GorillaGamer » Wed Aug 09, 2017 6:36 am

KingMan wrote:
Tue Aug 08, 2017 11:11 pm
Is Weepinduo one of the fusions?
No unfortunately. The closest there is to that would be Dunbell, a fusion between Weepinbell and Dunsparce.
Jesus man what is up with you and all of those waifus! Are you secretly the "Ultimate Pimp"?
An old quote from Project PATREON.

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Re: Pokemon Fangame Critique

Post by GorillaGamer » Thu Aug 17, 2017 8:29 am

Well it’s time for me to tackle one of the ‘big’ Pokémon fangames. With the final version being recently released, it’s time for us to talk about Pokémon Insurgence, a game made by the same team behind Pokémon Zeta and Omicron. Pokémon Insurgence is a massive fan project that boasts a lot of features from Zeta and Omicron, as well as a lot of new content to draw in more fans.

One of the major selling points of Insurgence is the inclusion of Delta Pokémon. Delta Pokémon are Pokémon that have a different typing from their regular counterparts as a result of genetic engineering. For instance, the regular Squirtle line is pure Water, whereas the Delta Squirtle line are Dark/Fighting. As of the final version, there are over 200 Delta Pokémon to play around with, and they all look amazing. Ever wondered what a Grass-type Snorlax looks like? How about a Dark/Fairy Roserade? Perhaps the thought of an Ice/Fighting Scizor gets you pumped up to try it out? Or how about a Rock/Dragon Avalugg? All these and more are present in Pokémon Insurgence, waiting to be caught.

Another selling point is that Insurgence has a lot of made up Mega Evolutions, for Pokémon that are underappreciated. Some of the Pokémon to get Mega Evolutions include the Johto starter Pokémon, Donphan, Flygon, Milotic, Spiritomb, Zoroark, Bisharp, Hydreigon and several more. There are also several Delta Pokémon that get their own Mega Evolutions, including the previously mentioned Delta Blastoise. Insurgence features all 721 Pokémon from the first six generations, with the developers stating that they didn’t have the time to add in the Gen 7 Pokémon. A shame since I’m quite curious on whether the Popplio line would have gotten a Delta variant or not.

A strong positive in Insurgence’s case is that the Torren region is quite large and filled with all sorts of various activities and whatnot. There’s the Sonata Racetrack where you can have a Pokémon of your choice race against three AI controlled opponents in order to attract sponsors, who’ll reward you with some useful items. In the same city is a Gachapon machine, where you send your Pokémon into the machine and obtain one of several rewards, be it an evolutionary stone, an item that can be sold for a lot of money, a nature change, and even the chance of your Pokémon becoming a shiny. There’s also several side quests that reward you with some money and even a Pokémon or two. The Secret Base also makes a comeback from Zeta and Omicron, so there’s that if you’re interested.

The graphics in the game look amazing. There’s a wide variety of environments, ranging from your standard forests, to your seaside town, and even a volcanic cave for you to explore. Then there’s the fact that both the sprites for the Delta Pokémon, and the new Mega Evolutions look excellent, with a few of the lacklustre sprites getting fine-tuned in between updates. However, while the music is quite catchy, there’s not a lot of variation. All the towns and the routes have the same few music tracks, and there’s the fact that all of the caves in the game have the same music track, and there are a lot of caves in the game. The only unique tracks you’ll hear is the boss theme for the cult leaders.

The gameplay is, in a single word, perfect. The game is quite hard, though luckily it doesn’t rely on cheap bullshit like Snakewood and Naturia did. The developers added in several new moves and abilities to power up both the Delta Pokémon, and the new Mega Evolutions. One new ability that was added in is Hubris, which boosts the users Special Attack by one stage every time it defeats an enemy Pokémon. The Gym Leader’s in the game also act differently; rather than base their team off a single type, they pick a theme. For instance, the first Gym Leader has a team which revolves around the use of Sunny Day, while a Gym Leader later in the game makes use of Rain Dance. The levels do not spike at an absurd rate, meaning that you shouldn’t have to spend so much time grinding, which is quite nice. Then there’s the fact that the Elite 4 are said to base their teams around some of the most powerful strategies in the meta-game. The routes aren’t too big, which makes travelling less of a chore, though it’s recommended that you explore the routes since you can find a Delta Pokémon or two.

And now it’s time to talk about the story, which is going to be a major part of the review when it comes to these RPG Maker games. Out of all the ‘big’ Pokémon fangames that I’ve played (Reborn, Rejuvenation, Insurgence etc.), I’ll have to say that this one has the best story. Mind you, it’s not as great as Black and White, or Sun and Moon, but it’s not an insufferable edge fest like the other fangames I mentioned. The plot of the game revolves around prophecy stating that a hero shall save the Torren region from the cults that plague the region. These cults worship different legendary Pokémon and will do anything to summon them and achieve their goals. Before the events of the game take place, a person known only as the First Auger fought alongside Hoopa to exterminate the hostile cults. However they ended up going missing, enabling a man named Jaern to take the mantle and become the Second Auger. Later on in the game, you find out that Jaern is really the leader of the Sky Cult, a group dedicated to summoning Rayquaza to take over the Torren Region and establish a utopia free of any and all crime.

It should be noted that several users on the Reborn forums criticised Insurgence for being unnecessarily dark. Asides from the fact that they’re throwing stones inside a glass house, they forgot to mention how you can switch the story from ‘Dark’ to a lighter version, where a lot of the darker elements of the story get taken out.

Insurgence also has a lot of replayability. Before you begin the game, you can go into the settings and access a menu that enables you to do a challenge run. These challenge runs include Randomiser, Nuzlocke, Egglocke and several other interesting challenges, such as the Solo Run challenge, where you can pick any Pokémon you want to use, but you can only have one Pokémon on your team. Another challenge is the Non-Technical challenge, which locks you out of using TMs and HMs. Luckily the game has several key items that can be used instead of HMs, should you decide to do this challenge.

At the end of the day, Insurgence is the closest a Pokémon fangame has ever come to the perfection of the mainstream games. Ironic, since one of the in-game cults wishes to create a perfect Pokémon, and was responsible for the creation of the Delta Pokémon. Not only is there a lot to do in the game, but the game offers a hard but fair challenge, and also has plenty of replay value. If I was asked to name my favourite Pokémon fangame of all time, it would have to be Insurgence.

Pros:
• The Delta Pokémon add an interesting spin to the game, and the new Mega Evolutions give several under-appreciated Pokémon a chance to shine.
• The game is quite difficult, but gives you a sense of accomplishment after defeating an important battle.
• The Torren region is filled with a lot of side activities to do.
• The challenge runs add a lot of replay value to the game.

Cons:
• While the music is catchy, the lack of variety can annoy some players.

Final score: 10 N’s out of 10

Inspired by Andrew in Steamland.
Jesus man what is up with you and all of those waifus! Are you secretly the "Ultimate Pimp"?
An old quote from Project PATREON.

KingMan
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Re: Pokemon Fangame Critique

Post by KingMan » Sat Aug 26, 2017 11:31 pm

Surprised Nintendo didn't issue a DMCA on this when Sun/Moon was announced, given that entry runs a similar concept with the Delta types.

In any event, just started the game and it runs nicely so far. Can't wait to see how it turns out.

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Re: Pokemon Fangame Critique

Post by GorillaGamer » Wed Aug 30, 2017 8:15 am

Before I begin the review, I’d like to give a shout out to the user on the AO discord chat who goes by the username Kirby 2000, who corrected me on the origins of Delta Pokémon. It turns out that the concept originated from the Trading Card Game, in the EX Delta Species expansion pack. I apologize for my lack of research.

One of the most reviled things in the gaming community is the term ‘overrated’. The word has been thrown around so much by hipsters who dislike a certain popular game, that to utter the word would put you on the same level of morality as a baby-rapist, in the eyes of gamers. The official definition for overrated reads ‘have a higher opinion of (someone or something) than is deserved’ doesn’t do the word any favours as people have different opinions on what is, and isn’t overrated. Now what I’m about to say next is going to upset a lot of people, but I need to get this off my chest.

Pokémon Reborn is, in my opinion, the most overrated Pokémon fangame ever made.

Yes it’s time to talk about Pokémon Reborn, one of the most infamous Pokémon fangames ever made. Now time for a little story; a few years ago I was obsessed with Pokémon Reborn and constantly talked about the game, singing praise about the story, the difficulty, the characters, and everything in between. Flash forward to a couple weeks ago, I decided to replay the game after a while to see if it holds up, following the release of the full version of Insurgence. It was then that I saw several problems in Reborn that younger me overlooked for some unknown reason. What was originally sunshine and lollipops was now a convoluted mess of over the top edge, unlikable and unrealistic characters, an absurd difficulty that borders on bullshit several times, and one of the most insufferable fanbases of all time.

Now before I dig into all the shit the game gives us, it’s important to point out the positive aspects of the game, so as to not look biased. The best thing about the game is how it expanded on the terrain effects that X and Y introduced. As of the current version out now, there are over 30 different terrains, each one providing various effects to different moves and types. Such effects include boosting the power of offensive moves based on their type (Grass moves getting boosted on Grassy Terrain), Secret Power having a chance to inflict a debuff/status ailment, status moves such as Swords Dance doubling their effect (4 Attack increases instead of 2), and various other effects along the way. Most of the terrains are used by the Reborn regions Gym Leaders to gain an advantage over the player, however there are moves that can destroy/change these terrains and give the player an advantage.

Another major plus about the game is that the graphics look absolutely spectacular. There’s a wide variety of environments to explore such as an abandoned factory, the icy caves of the regions tallest mountain, and even a large valley decorated with various crystals. The city of Reborn starts out as this place ravaged by various natural disasters, but as the game goes on it transforms into a brightly colored paradise. Then there’s the character designs; while a few of them are cringeworthy to look at *cough* Terra *cough*, there’s several designs that look quite slick, especially some of the female characters. If you and your mates are desperate for a Pokéwaifu, then you could do worse. As for their personalities…well that’s best left for later.

And now it’s time to go into the negatives of the game, and boy are there some huge problems with the game, such as the difficulty. I’m going to be blunt here; Reborn is the Pokémon equivalent of the Treaty of Versailles. That’s not to say that difficulty is a bad thing, but Reborn goes way too far when it comes to making a challenge. First of all, there’s the level cap that made Naturia such a pain in the ass. It’s a lot more fair here than in Naturia, but that doesn’t mean that I like the mechanic. Then there’s the fact that you have to go out of your way to capture good Pokémon. I’m not talking about Legendries/ultra-powerful Pokémon, I’m talking about Pokémon that are average to decent, and are usually not worth the effort to find them. The Pokémon that you encounter in the grass have niche use and will most likely be boxed a couple of badges in. Then there’s the fact that a lot of the TMs that are programed into the game as of now are either moves with weak attack power, or moves that serve little use unless you’re using a specific strategy. Another part of the difficulty is the small range of items you can buy in stores. You don’t get much money from winning battles at the start of the game, which is alright to be honest. However what isn’t alright is the pathetically small range of items you can get. For the first few hours of the game, you’re stuck with meagre Potions and simple status recovery items. By the time you get enough money to get a good amount of them, your Pokémon will be levelled enough that you’ll need Super Potions instead. God help you if you pick up a Pokémon that requires an item to evolve, as you’ll have to do several quests including a few that are fairly late in the game before you can effectively stock up on evolution items. There’s also the fact that the Gym Leaders are packing a full team of Pokemon, that are designed so that you either have to get lucky with status effects and crits, or resort to using a niche strategy that’ll take a lot of time to build up and will only see use in that specific battle. I can appreciate a good challenge, but when the game throws so many curveballs and restrictions at you, it gets ridiculous. Luckily the levels of the enemy Pokemon don’t sky-rocket at any point so there’s that.

Now it’s time for what you’ve been waiting for, the moment where I break apart the “amazing” story of the game, and expose it for the edgy Tumblr fanfic that it really is. You know that you’re in for a ride when the game starts out by having a train station blow up, killing everyone but the player character. It’s here that you meet two characters; Julia, the electric type Gym Leader who’s meant to be hyperactive, but comes across as a young child on a 24/7 caffeine high, and Ame, the professor/champion of the Reborn League, and the self-insert of the lead game developer. Later on you’ll meet the three rivals for the game; Cain the flamboyant pansexual, Victoria the determined disciple who’s about as interesting as a dead leaf, and Fern the obnoxious narcissist who constantly trash-talks the player and tries too hard to be hateable. The main villains of the game are this shadowy organisation known as Team Meteor, a group of edgelords lead by Solaris who wants to kick everyone out of the region. Eventually Team Meteor gets a new leader named Lin, who’s the edgiest character in the entire game, and that’s saying something. Team Meteor wishes to unlock the door to a cave containing some meteorite in order to use it’s powers, however they need four pieces of jewelry that are nothing more than glorified MacGuffins, and these items are in the hands of four random girls who coincidentally hold high positions in the Reborn League. Unfortunately these girls can’t do a damn thing without the help of the player, despite the developers hyping them up as these powerful characters who can do things on their own.

Reborn constantly likes to hammer in that this isn’t a Pokémon game for kiddies, and has a few characters die in order to prove a point. For example, the father of one of the MacGuffin Girls jumps off a bridge and falls to his death, with Fern popping in to remind the player that ‘YOU’RE MEANT TO HATE THIS GUY!’, while another character ends up getting beheaded by Solaris’ Garchomp, and was critically ill as well. But there’s more than deaths to crank up the edge dial; for one thing there’s a whole lot of swearing in the character dialogue. Now swearing on it’s own isn’t necessarily edgy, but the game throws out several cusswords in order to look cool and mature. Then there’s this one scene where Amaria, the Water type Gym Leader jumps off a waterfall after finding out that her lesbian lover Titania didn’t really love her. And how can I forgot about Dr. Connal, a nutjob who gets a kick out of electrocuting underage orphans? I can go on and on about the batshit ridiculous story, but it’s time to talk about the characters, and boy are they a doozy.

One of the major issues with the story is that the most of the characters are about as likable as a case of swine flu. I already mentioned several of the games “amazing” characters, but there’s a few special cases that I need to mention. One of these cases is Luna, the Dark type Gym Leader who spouts out some of the most cringeworthy dialogue in the game, which is really saying something. Then there’s Bennett, a creepy Bug type trainer who’s infatuated with Luna and wants to rape her or something and gets indoctrinated into some Arceus-worshipping cult. Another noteworthy character is Adrienn, a non-binary character who ends up being rather decent, despite their introduction being followed by a lengthy explanation on the whole gender-spectrum thing, because what Pokémon game is complete without a lesson about gender identity? And how can I forget about Titania, the character who gives Lin a run for her money for the title of edgiest character in the game?

But easily the worst character by far, is Terra. She’s the Ground type Gym Leader and speaks solely in memes and leet speak and is so goddamn annoying. The developers added her into the game in order to inject some “wacky humor” in the game, but it goes against the narrative that they present to us. How can we take this story serious, when a character like Terra exists within the story? The only character that has any semblance of likability in the game is Charlotte, the Fire type Gym Leader. One likable character out of 25+ is definitely not a good sign. The kicker? All of the characters in the game are based off of real people who are friends with the head developer and hung out with her on a now dead Pokémon forum. Events such as character deaths and other personal issues actually happened to the people who the characters were based on, including the suicidal father. Puts the game in a new light, doesn’t it?

And then there’s the fanbase. I haven’t brought this point up in my other reviews because it wasn’t relevant then, but this needs to be said. The fanbase for the game gets incredibly defensive over the game. They have no problem pointing out the flaws present in other fangames and the official games, but get upset if you criticize the game. Lord have mercy on you if you criticize the story of the game, as you can expect 15+ users to rant about how they’re sick of people calling the story edgy. Another hot topic issue in the official Reborn forums is whether the game is ‘pushing a progressive agenda’. I’m not going to put in my $0.02 about the issue; I’ll leave it up to the readers.

At the end of the day, while Reborn does have some good points to it, it also has a lot of problems with it. The difficulty is too high for what little reward you’re given (more “quality writing” about suicidal lesbians and obnoxious rivals), the story and characters are boring at best, and cringeworthy at worst, and the fanbase can get quite insufferable. One last thing before I go is that the music in the game is top-notch. The music consists of a lot of remixes of official Pokémon music, courtesy of GlitchxCity. I’d recommend downloading the game, only for the music. You’re honestly better off playing Insurgence in my opinion.

And to think…of all the Reborn-style fangames out there, this is the best one. (Insurgence doesn’t fall under that category since it isn’t difficult enough.)

Pros:
• The music remixes are pleasant to listen to.
• The graphics look amazing, with some of the character designs looking pretty slick.
• The varying field effects add a spin to battle that was barely touched upon in the main game.

Cons:
• The difficulty can get absurd at times, given how many restrictions are placed upon the player.
• The story reads like a Pokémon fanfiction written by a 14-year old.
• The fanbase can get insufferable at times, especially if you criticise the story.

Final verdict: 6 N’s out of 10

Inspired by Andrew in Steamland.
Jesus man what is up with you and all of those waifus! Are you secretly the "Ultimate Pimp"?
An old quote from Project PATREON.

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Re: Pokemon Fangame Critique

Post by Revolver Giraffe » Thu Sep 14, 2017 9:54 am

GorillaGamer wrote:
Wed Aug 30, 2017 8:15 am
while another character ends up getting beheaded by Solaris’ Garchomp, and was critically ill as well.
Pokemon Reborn in a nutshell.

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