Pokemon Fangame Critique

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GorillaGamer
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Re: Pokemon Fangame Critique

Post by GorillaGamer » Tue Sep 19, 2017 9:46 am

AN: Sorry for the late update, but I was struck down with a nasty stomach bug. I’m all better now in case you’re asking.

Previously I talked about Pokémon Reborn, the edgy darling of the Pokémon fangame community. However now it’s time to talk about one of its sister games, Pokémon Rejuvenation and believe it or not, it’s even edgier than Pokémon Reborn. I will warn you that apart from the story and a few additions to the gameplay, it’s exactly like Reborn, so don’t expect the review to be as long as some of the other ones.

The major addition that Rejuvenation added in was the return of Shadow Pokémon. In case you don’t know what Shadow Pokémon are, they’re Pokémon who have had their hearts closed, removing all emotions and turning them into soulless fighting machines. They were first introduced in Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness and added a unique spin to Pokémon battling. However their presence in the game makes little to no sense, since the main antagonists stop using Shadow Pokémon a quarter of the way in the game, leading me to believe that Shadow Pokémon are only in the game so as to make Team Xen more “menacing.”

The difficulty of Rejuvenation is something to be believed. For one thing the field effects are amplified to obscene levels. For example, the Ghost field has an effect that causes Spite to lower a move’s PP to 0, as opposed to lowering it by 4 like in the official games. The Ghost field also grants Hypnosis 100% accuracy, and doubles the chance for Ominous Wind’s secondary effect to activate. Oh and Dark type moves get a power decrease on the field, because of course they would. Then there’s the fact that Valerie, the Water type Gym Leader was hilariously broken. Not only do all her Pokémon have moves that countered any viable strategy you use against her, but her field greatly lowered the speed of every Pokémon except Water and Flying type Pokémon. It got to the point where the developer had to nerf her, just to give players a fighting chance.

Apart from that, there’s nothing new to the gameplay. It still features the field effects that made Reborn as popular as it is, as well as the restrictions that made the game a pain to play. (Level cap, lack of decent Pokémon at the beginning, etc.) However the developer of Rejuvenation went a step further and created an Elite 8 as opposed to an Elite 4, something which is hilariously asinine. The graphics for the game look just as well as Reborn’s graphics, which makes sense in context, given that they’re often considered to be sister games. The game also uses music tracks by GlitchxCity, so you know that the music will be great at least.

And now it’s time to delve into Rejuvenation’s story, and boy is it special. You may remember how I brought up the fact that Reborn starts off with a train station blowing up; Rejuvenation decides to crank up the dial by having a large cruise ship getting invaded by multiple Deoxys’ created and controlled by Team Xen. They capture the players mother and blow up the ship because why not? However the player manages to escape in time and end up at the Gearen Laboratory, where they register for the league and go on a quest to obtain all the Gym Badges and defeat Team Xen.

And now it’s time to take a closer look at the story and examine it’s flaws, because they’re especially glaring. Let’s start with the game’s antagonists, Team Xen. For starters, we know very little about their goals, even though the current version goes up to the middle of the story. All we know about them is that they have a vast arsenal of Shadow Pokémon and several clones of Deoxys at their disposal. Speaking of Team Xen, they manage to crank up the annoyance dial by being one of those villains who are seemingly unaffected by any of the players exploits. What I mean is that even if you manage to take over one of their bases and put a stop to their plans, they’ll chuckle about how that base wasn’t important to them, and how you actually did them a favour. Expect this to happen several times throughout the story; since the developer is too scared to have his Villain Sue’s show any sign of weakness.

Another part of the story that’s insufferable is the whole Goldenleaf Town saga. For those lucky souls who haven’t played the game, the villagers of the town have a strong hatred of outsiders because the local radio tower was burnt down, killed everyone who worked there. They go so far as to lynch people who dare enter the town and politely ask for a Gym Battle (The Goldenleaf Gym Leader was the one who created the anti-outsider stance to begin with.) What doesn’t help is that one of your rivals prevents you from entering the town, and throws a screeching fit when you successfully manage to convince the Gym Leader to dismantle the xenophobic law. This seemingly innocent act causes the rival to defect to Team Xen, and become an even bigger dickhead in the process. Rejuvenation’s story-telling as a whole is subpar, but this part is especially terrible.

Let’s move onto the characters, because boy are you in for a treat. Let’s start off by talking about Ren, the butthurt rival I mentioned earlier. Turns out that before his defection, he was an insufferable dickhead. To put it simply, he’s the over-enthusiastic guy who quickly gets on people’s nerves. Then there’s Angie, who’s some batshit-crazy worshipper of Arceus who freeze’s people with her ice powers (Think of her as a dollar-store Esdeath from Akame ga Kill.) It’s a common trope in these edgy fan games to depict all religious figures as insane cultists, as if the developers are taking an anti-religious stance. But arguably the most infamous characters in the game are, as 4Chan puts it ‘The Four Bitches of the Apocalypse’, a term used to describe the characters of Melia, Venam, Saki and Amber. Venam, Saki and Amber constantly get into arguments and generally act bitchy all the time, to the point where they drag the player into a seemingly pointless double-battle. Venam is the more tolerable member of the trio, and she constantly pretends to play dead so she can mooch free food from other people. Saki is an arrogant, snarky teenager who makes your stay in prison even more miserable. And Amber is what happens if you take Audrey from Hunie Pop, crank up the bitchiness dial until it snaps, and give her a guitar and lots of money.

Which leaves us with Melia, the golden child of Rejuvenation and who the story revolves around. To put it simply, she’s a Mary Sue. Not only does she receive training from a pair of humans who have some mastery over space and time, she’s also a genius at repairing and inventing gadgets, and has a power which attracts shiny Pokémon towards her. The sad thing is that Rejuvenation’s cast is so shit, Melia ends up being the best character in the damn thing. One thing I will give credit to the developer is that they actually tweaked Melia’s story so that she’s less of a Sue and gets a few traits that make her a little more likable.

And in Reborn fashion, Rejuvenation adds in copious amounts of references in order to elicit a laugh from it’s audience. As of the current version, the game has references to Harry Potter, Undertale, several shout-outs to Pokémon Reborn, and even a reference to a fangame based off of Five Nights at Freddys. There is no reason for these references to exist, other than to appeal to the audience and have them clap like seals over seeing their favourite game getting referenced in Rejuvenation. These references can even ruin an emotional scene, with a major example being the main villain dropping an anime reference, after slaying the player character’s mother right in front of them.

In the end, Rejuvenation is even more insufferable than Reborn. Hell, a user on 4Chan summarised Rejuvenation as being ‘Imagine reborn, but made by a single waifu-obsessed weeaboo who believes the pinnacle of characterisation is depicted in his moeshit.’ And after playing the game, I’d have to agree with the poster. If you didn’t enjoy Reborn, then there’s no way you’ll enjoy Rejuvenation.

Pros:
• The music is top notch as always.
• The graphics look impressive.
• Melia’s alright I guess.

Cons:
• The story is even edgier than Reborn, and that’s saying something.
• The field effects have gotten even worse, making some battles a pain in the ass.
• A lot of the characters are either bland, insufferable, or a combination of both.
• Copious references can get grating on a person’s nerves.
• Has several of the same bullshit restrictions that were present in Reborn.

Final Score: 3.5 N’s out of 10

Inspired by Andrew in Steamland.
Jesus man what is up with you and all of those waifus! Are you secretly the "Ultimate Pimp"?
An old quote from Project PATREON.

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Re: Pokemon Fangame Critique

Post by GorillaGamer » Mon Sep 25, 2017 8:13 am

After tackling both Reborn and Rejuvenation, I wanted to take a break from edgy Pokémon fangames. But then I learnt that there existed a third game in the ‘trilogy’, a little game known as Pokémon Desolation. After playing up to the end of the current version, I was surprised to see that it was more enjoyable than the other two games. Mind you, it still has the edgy story that’s in all of these Reborn-style games, but there’s enough new gameplay elements to keep you invested in it.

We’ll begin by talking about some of these elements that help Desolation stand out from the crowd, starting with the Reputation system. For those of you who don’t know what I’m talking about, the Reputation system presents itself whenever the player character has to make a dialogue choice in the game. Selecting any of the options will give you some favour points towards one character, while losing some points towards another character. You can also gain/lose points by committing an action that a character finds admirable/reprehensible, with the amount of points being higher than the dialogue choice. The story is altered slightly depending on your reputation with the characters, an example being that it alters the condition needed to save a certain character. The reputation system at the moment is fairly barebones, but that’s due to the game being in it’s infancy. I’m fairly confident that this system will improve as later versions of the game get released.

Another major element is the addition of side quests in the game. While they’re present in Rejuvenation, they weren’t big enough in that game to warrant a mention. In Desolation, they made side quests more desirable by adding in the Credit store. Credits can be obtained by performing some side quests, ranging from defeating a rogue Pokémon gone wild, to finding a specific item, and even battling a trainer. These Credits can be exchanged for rare items and even some powerful Pokémon such as Machop, Magnemite and Ralts. A majority of these quests require you to join the Pokémon Rangers, however that’s accomplished quite early in the game. Once you complete these quests, you get given a special quest by the head of the Rangers that’s more difficult than the previous quests, but has a much better reward.

The final major element added in the game is the presence of a “main hub”. Near the end of the current version, you get given a large manor for saving Blackview City from a major assault by the game’s antagonists. The manor has a built in store where you can recruit vendors that sell a variety of items, by spending Credits or completing a side quest. From that point on, you earn a set amount of Credits after every Gym Battle, depending on the amount of vendors acquired. Additionally there’s a tunnel in the basement that leads to an area where you can grind a Pokémon’s Effort Values if you’re into that sort of thing. Finally there’s a PC that enables you to re-battle important trainers as many times as you like, in case you need to grind for EXP. However there’s a better way to grind EXP, that being the Underground Arena. The Underground Arena requires progressing through the story to unlock, however it will prove to be an invaluable resource as it can provide you with EXP, money, and even Credits.

And those are the major additions to the game, with the rest of them being features that are all too familiar for those of you who have played Reborn-styled fangames. The infamous level cap rears it’s ugly head once again, alongside the field effects. I know that in Reborn, Rejuvenation and Desolation, you can use Common Candies to lower a Pokémon’s level by one, but it doesn’t make the cap any more bearable. However unlike Reborn and Rejuvenation, you aren’t restricted to weak Pokémon that require niche strategies to become remotely useful, mainly due to the Credit Store. Luckily you aren’t handed overpowered Pokémon at the beginning, so there does exist balance in the game. The graphics for the game are better than in the other two games, due to the presence of environmental diversity. While Reborn is set in a dark and gloomy city for a good chunk of the game, Desolation treats you to a spectacle of environments, such as a jungle, an underground village, a cemetery located in a foggy cave, and even inside a volcano. It’s standard Pokémon fare yes, but it’s a welcome relief from the generic ruined city that’s present in Reborn. The music is also an improvement from the other two games; while there’s a plentiful amount of GlitchxCity tracks, there’s also the presence of music created by independent creators, as well as tracks from other video games. These video game tracks are taken from games such as Final Fantasy, Halo, Touhou and even Danganronpa. (In case you didn’t know, the Reborn fanbase is obsessed with Danganronpa.)

And now it’s time to talk about the story. I’ll give it credit in that it’s nowhere near as bad as Reborn’s, but it’s still painfully edgy. The story starts with the player character registering for the Ayrith League, which takes place across six islands. They’re joined by their childhood friends Scarlett and Ava, with the latter being the Grass-type Gym Leader. A few minutes later, the cruise ship they’re boarding gets hijacked by one of the antagonistic groups and subsequently explodes, because why not at this point. The player character washes up ashore alongside Connor, the Fire-type Gym Leader who’s dependable, if a bit narcissistic. Shortly after reuniting with your friends, you come across one of the two antagonistic organisations currently present in the game, Team Crescent, led by the enigmatic Nova. Their goal is to capture Darkrai and manipulate it to put everyone to sleep and create a dream world, free from the clutches of famine and war. Putting aside the monumentally stupid decision to create a dream world using the Pokémon associated with nightmares, I’ll admit that it’s better than Team Xen’s plan of causing destruction and chaos for seemingly no reason. The other antagonistic team present in the game are the Black Foxes, a group of rogue thugs that like to steal and generally make the lives of the civilian populace as miserable as possible.

And now let’s talk about the characters in the game. While I’ll admit that they’re better than the cast from Reborn and Rejuvenation, they’re average at best. You have Ava, who’s the snarky member of the group, but doesn’t become as insufferable as Saki from Rejuvenation. Then there’s Scarlett, the peppy young girl who’s this game’s waifu bait, but better than Shauna from X and Y. Though given how fucking shit Shauna is, that’s not saying much. There’s the previously mentioned Connor, whose occasional jabs at the player character is reminiscent of Blue from Fire Red/Leaf Green. Then there’s Shiv, who’s introduced early into the game and is the developers self-insert. Like Nova, he’s an enigmatic figure who’s gifted with special powers and has an Aipom as his ace Pokémon, which is fitting since Aipom is the mascot for this game. Shiv’s older sister Aurora also has these special powers, however she’s more merciless and mysterious than her brother. The rest of the cast isn’t noteworthy, though as later versions get released, they may get their time to shine.

Desolation is an interesting case in that it’s more enjoyable than the game it takes inspiration from. Despite being only up to Version 4.1.1, there’s a lot of content in the game. As heretical as this sounds, Desolation is the only Reborn-style game that I’d recommend. Join me next time, where I talk about one of the worst fan games I’ve ever played.

Pros:
• The games side quests promise a lot of additional play time.
• The difficulty isn’t as extreme as it’s counterparts, though it still provides a fair challenge.
• The characters are quite engaging and can grow on a player over time.
• There’s a wide variety in environments and music tracks.

Cons:
• The game’s story is as painfully edgy as its counterparts.

Final score 8 N’s out of 10

Inspired by Andrew in Steamland.
Jesus man what is up with you and all of those waifus! Are you secretly the "Ultimate Pimp"?
An old quote from Project PATREON.

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Re: Pokemon Fangame Critique

Post by GorillaGamer » Wed Oct 11, 2017 2:29 am

I’ve talked about a wide variety of Pokémon fangames, be they excellent, mediocre, or flat out terrible. All of them had one thing in common; I enjoyed playing them for a while, depending on the quality of the game. However the game I’m going to review has the dubious honour of being the worst fangame I ever played. It’s not broken like Pokémon Sweet 2th, nor is it absurdly difficult like Naturia, but it commits the cardinal sin of being so fucking boring. Ladies and gentleman, I present to you, Pokémon Full Moon.

Pokémon Full Moon is another Reborn-style fangame, because we really needed more of those in our lives. The game prides itself on its deep and dark story, fully-fleshed out characters, challenging gameplay, and hours of side content. But what the game SHOULD be priding itself on is being a blatant rip-off of Reborn, Rejuvenation and even Insurgence.

What do I mean by this? The game uses a lot of sprites from those mentioned games, changing the colour in order to turn them into the fangame equivalent of DONUT STEEL. At least when Desolation was called out on doing the same thing, the developer fixed up the problematic sprites and created some new ones which look rather slick. Full Moon however, still has the rip off sprites and hasn’t done anything to alleviate the fans grievances. Additionally, the game also rips off several plot points from the mentioned games, such as Gym Leaders joining the antagonistic group.

Like with Desolation, Full Moon goes for lesser known music track remixes, with a lot of them being top notch. However they also ripped off various tracks from other sources, such as Drawn to Life, Sword Art Online and Undertale. The graphics are what you expect from a game such as this, though I will credit the developers by mentioning that there’s a wide variety of environments to explore in the game. However those are the only good parts about the game, as the rest is painfully terrible.

Let’s start by mentioning the difficulty; it’s too easy. Now I know that this is unusual to see in a review of a Reborn-style fangame, but it’s the truth. Sure the level cap is there, but it barely makes a difference where by the first badge, you can get some solid team options such as a Riolu, Bulbasaur, Gible, Arcanine, and even the legendary Cresselia. Throughout the game, you are given Legendary Pokémon quite frequently, including Marshadow at the end of the latest episode, as well as various Mega Stones. This makes the game’s difficulty trivial as you can steamroll through the Gym Leaders, using your legendary Pokémon. The game tries to offset this by giving all 18 Gym Leaders a Mega Evolution, but it doesn’t help one bit. Furthermore, you get gifted with powerful TM’s at the beginning (I’m talking moves such as Thunderbolt and Ice Beam.) and will never be strapped for cash. As much as I criticized some of the games I mentioned in earlier reviews for being too hard, I hate it when a game is too easy.

Then there’s the story. Holy shit, the story. I’ll go so far as to say it’s the worst story I’ve ever seen in a Pokémon fangame, and I played through Snakewood for fucks sake. The story revolves around a teenage girl named Luna (I don’t know whether she has anything to do with Luna from Reborn), who ran away from the academy after getting bullied by some boy named Chan. Chan finds her and confesses his love to her, which Luna responds by confessing back. Nevermind the fact that this is not how relationships work at all, it’s like Luna forgot about all the bullying and immediately became Chan’s waifu. This is not the only time that romance is shoe-horned into the game. Off the top of my head, there are five official couples among the group of teenagers that are rebelling against the villainous team, Team Lightning. Team Lightning want to take over the region, and have successfully managed to disguise themselves as a police force to protect the region. Whether the developers are calling out the police or not is up to speculation.

The game is riddled with asinine plot points. At one point the group end up in the Distortion World, where Orchedy, another piece of waifu bait, gets bitten by an Ariados and is fatally poisoned. She ends up dying, only for Therus to pull some medicine out of his ass and proclaim that it can cure anything, even death itself. Naturally Therus ends up dying shortly after, and the medicine is never mentioned again. Another asinine plot point is at the end of the current episode, where Marshadow is evil for some reason, and creates an army of Heartless Sora’s from Kingdom Hearts. Don’t ask me what that’s about, as I’ve got no clue. And then there’s Hakon, some character who was raised by a bunch of Zoura and Zoroark and witnessed his parents getting killed by Professor Gobline, who’s an Oak recolour, wearing an all-black outfit, because it’s so EDGY! There was also a plot point where Luna proclaims that she’ll never forgive her parents for “abandoning” her at the academy, yet the moment she reunites with them, it’s all sunshine and flowers as if the plot point never existed. I could rip into the games plot for a long time, but it’s time I talk about the characters.

We’ll start off with Luna, who to put it simple, is unlikable. Asides from the fact that she constantly acts bitchy, she’s also a major hypocrite. The major instance is where she scolds the villains for attempting to capture Zapdos, yet proceeds to capture it anyway. Then there’s Chan, who is not only a self-centred jackass, since he bullied Luna a few years ago, he’s also a coward to boot, and ends up dumping Luna by running away. The rest of the protagonists are bland and one-dimensional. There’s the Zoroark furry Hakon, Nello who is Chan’s annoying little brother, Orchedy who is Luna’s BFF and that’s about it, Arietta who’s a rip off of Valerie from Rejuvenation, in terms of sprite and character, and Lumos who is Luna’s brother and was hastily retconned into the plot. The villains are also one-dimensional and aren’t worth noting at all. As bad as the villains are in other fangames, at least they had something that was noteworthy about them.

Full Moon has a few miscellaneous problems scattered into the game as well, like sprinkles on top of a shit-covered donut. For starters, there are a lot of typos that should have been easy to miss. Granted, the developers are Spanish and they stated that their English isn’t perfect, but surely they could have hired someone to check the writing for the game. Additionally, the areas are quite large and are easy to get lost in, with a jungle in the midgame taking the cake, as it can take an hour or two to go through, as it’s easy to get lost. But the most asinine part is that at certain points, the game requires you to play the game on a Sunday to progress. This isn’t a side quest or anything, this is the main story getting halted because you’re playing on the wrong day. Granted, you can change the date on your computer to bypass this, but it shouldn’t even be in the game to begin with.

Full Moon was a painful experience. Even if I were to ignore the blatant rip-off’s, stupid design choices, and atrocious writing, that wouldn’t save the game from being so fucking boring. I’d recommend watching a walkthrough, if you really want to see the game for yourself. Just don’t play it, unless you have a death wish.

Pros:
• The music and environments are alright

Cons:
• The game is too easy, due to the abundance of powerful/legendary Pokémon.
• The story is a trainwreck that puts other trainwrecks to shame.
• The game’s riddled with stupid design choices.
• The game has no identity, due to its incessant need to fit in with the other Reborn-style games.

Final Score: 1 N out of 10

Inspired by Andrew in Steamland.

AN: This will be the last Reborn-style game I’ll review for a while, unless people want me to review Pokémon Conspiracy.
Jesus man what is up with you and all of those waifus! Are you secretly the "Ultimate Pimp"?
An old quote from Project PATREON.

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GorillaGamer
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Re: Pokemon Fangame Critique

Post by GorillaGamer » Sun Oct 15, 2017 6:35 am

So I was on the Discord chat, doing a play through of a little game called Pokémon: Conspiracy, when I got the sudden urge to do a review on it. Those of you who saw the play through should know my thoughts on the game, but for those of you who haven’t, I’ll tell you right now, it’s shit. Now to be fair, it wasn’t as painful an experience as Full Moon was, and it is a newly released game, but if this version is anything to go by, then I don’t have high hopes for it.

So what exactly is Pokémon Conspiracy? It’s a fangame that revolves around the lives of a group of African-American adults in their early twenties, as they attempt to uncover a conspiracy concocted by the police, who go by the incredibly subtle Team Order. The developer of the game proudly proclaims this, as if this was the first game to ever feature a black protagonist, and states that the game will take a look at things such as racism, homophobia and sexism. Never mind the fact that nearly every other Reborn knockoff talks about the same shit, nobody plays Pokémon to read a lecture on why racism is bad. That comment about it being a Reborn knock off is true, as it shoehorns in so many references to both Reborn and Rejuvenation that it shows that Conspiracy lacks any sense of identity.

Let’s talk about the music and the graphics, since they’re worth pointing out. The music for the game is quite lacklustre, as it mainly consists of hip-hop/rap tracks that are popular in the African-American community, though I will give the developer credit for not going down the lazy route and using the same 20 tracks that are heard in every one of these Reborn Style games. The graphics are also quite lacklustre, as they appear choppy and don’t mesh well with the environment. A noteworthy part is the fact that whenever a character speaks, a small icon box will show a picture of a realistic African-American person, which sticks out like a sore thumb. But easily the most hilarious part is that midway through the game, we’re introduced to a picture of a hyper-realistic cop that you hear about in shitty ‘Lost Episode’ creepypastas.
Creepy Cop.png
Creepy Cop.png (69.42 KiB) Viewed 17 times
The gameplay is what you’d expect from a Reborn style game. Gym leaders have six Pokémon, there’s a level cap implemented to prevent you from grinding, decent Pokémon are hard to come by, and regular trainers often have powerful Pokémon on their teams. Honestly, you’ve read these things in all my other reviews on these games, and it’s getting tiring to see them everywhere. The people on the Reborn forums talk about Pokémon fangames moving forwards, yet honestly I feel that they’ve made a few steps backwards. And they say they can make better games than Gamefreak and Nintendo.

Now let’s get into the story of this game, which is Pokemon Reborn but with black people in it. I wish I could say something else, but that’s what it literally is. Anyway, your character is attending a Pokémon collage, alongside your friends Teala and Michael. Part way through the story, you read about the disappearance of a girl named Amelia who’s the fiancée of a man known as Kewon, and how Team Order could have something to do with the disappearance. And what Reborn style story would it be without unnecessary amounts of edge? For instance, there the previously mentioned cop from before who is stalking Teala for some apparent reason. Then there’s this scene near the end where the main character’s sister gouges a Treavenant’s eye out, killing the poor thing. It’s hilarious how juvenile these games come across, in a desperate attempt to look mature. It reminds me of Akame ga Kill, but I’d be doing that dung heap a disservice by associating it with this game.

Then there’s the characters. The male MC is a loner who likes to hang out with his friends only, while the female MC is someone who has low self-esteem and thinks that they’re ugly. Teala was the ex-girlfriend of the MC and not only trash-talks people frequently, but can get physically violent at times, while Micheal is a smug trainer, who tries and fails to be as cool as Gary/Blue from Fire Red/Leaf Green. Kewon is my favorite character in the game, mainly because he doesn’t act like a jackass all the time. The rest of the characters aren’t that memorable, and aren’t worth the time to write about.

I do apologize for cutting the review short, but what else is there to say? The game is a dime-a-dozen Reborn knockoff, and has no identity since it constantly insert’s references to Reborn. I know I should’ve waited for a few more versions to be released before reviewing the game, but if the prologue is anything to go by, then the games not worth playing. Oh and the game has too many pointless achievements in it.

Pros:
• A decent variety of music is present in the game, however lacklustre it is.

Cons:
• The game has no sense of identity whatsoever, making it hard to stand out from the crowd.
• The proclamation of featuring an African-American cast rings hollow, since the later Pokémon games enable you to change your character’s skin colour.
• The story and characters are wholly unoriginal, and have been done before in these games.
• There are far too many references to other fangames in it, making the game come across as a circlejerk.

Final Score: 1 N out of 10

Inspired by Andrew in Steamland.
Jesus man what is up with you and all of those waifus! Are you secretly the "Ultimate Pimp"?
An old quote from Project PATREON.

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