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GorillaGamer
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Gorilla Reviews

Post by GorillaGamer » Thu Oct 05, 2017 11:44 pm

AN: I managed to archive some old game reviews I did on Project AFTER, before the site went down the shitter. Now they're back in all the glory they never had. I might alternate between doing these and Pokemon fangame reviews.

Game: Fantasy War Tactics

Summary:


Fantasy War Tactics is a tactical role-playing game, developed and published by Nexon, the same company that developed Maplestory. It was released on the App store on the 5th of November 2015, and has developed a cult following of sorts. One of the main selling points of this game is that you can get all of the 50+ heroes in the game, free of charge (We’ll get back to this statement later on.) The game is free to download, but contains In-App-Purchases, ranging from 5USD to 100USD. The developers promise “Challenging fights to prove you are a master tactician” and “Intense PvP battles.” Let us now delve into the story of the game.

Story:

The story of the game has you play as an unnamed Lord, who wishes to conquer the world…or what’s left of it. You see, before the events of the game, there was a cataclysmic flood that wiped out around 80% of the world population, leaving only the Arc continent unscathed. Using his powerful life magic, the main character revives a knight from the ancient times, going by the name of Chris, and begins his plans to conquer the world. As the story progresses, the pair end up meeting more characters, including Ian, a cat that has lost all his memories and travels with the group to find them, Alfred, a wizard who taught the main character a few years ago and Serendi, a dryad who hasn’t left her home forest until encountering the protagonists. After reaching the first region, you soon learn that a mysterious organisation known as the World Reformation Council has already conquered the world. Defeating the final boss of the third region reveals that the leader of the Council is a talented arch mage going by the name of Klein, the rival to the main protagonist during his years in school. From there on, the story delves into the territory of clichés, such as the assistant of the main antagonist being the true mastermind, and the former empire committing a number of atrocities such as human experimentation and slavery. The characters also has a few problems; while characters such as Serendi, Ian and Lee have some personality and depth to them, a majority of the other characters are bland and one dimensional. An example of this is with Muang, an insane man who wields a flamethrower and is obsessed with burning stuff. Nexon attempts to develop these characters with numerous side stories that are unlocked upon recruiting certain characters, but these side stories mostly end up becoming random skits from a subpar comedy anime *cough*Lucky Star*cough*.

Sound/Art:

The sound design of the game is pretty decent. You can download the Korean voices for the characters in the options menu, and to the games credit, the voice actors did a nice job of capturing the characters personality. The rest of the sounds are decent, with none of them grating to the ears. The music however, is subpar. All of the tracks are generic and don’t leave a lasting impression on the listener.

The art is another story all together. To the untrained eye, the character portraits look alright. However, a closer analysis reveals several problems. The major problem is that the character proportions feel off, several of the male characters have large upper bodies, but ridiculously small and thin legs, leaving you wondering how they can manage to walk at all. One in particular, the werewolf Jack, has a thin torso and massive shoulders, as well as stick thin legs. The females are a different beast altogether; with the exception of the four young girls (Because the fanbase love their lolis), all of the girls have gravity defying breasts, that cause some serious strain to their backs. Lena in particular, has breasts that you would normally see on a Skullgirls character. I can safely say that the artists behind the character designs were drawing with only one hand. Apart from the characters, the rest of the art is quite nice. The environments are quite detailed and are generally well done.

Gameplay:

So how is the gameplay you ask? Painfully average, bordering on subpar.

The main gameplay consists of sending your team of five heroes into battles, to fight off numerous enemies, in a set amount of turns. You can deal extra damage by attacking the enemy from the side, with a superior type, or on your heroes preferred terrain, (water, lava etc.) Each hero has one of three different types, (Rock, Paper or Scissors.) as well as a different battle type (Attack, Defence, Support, Area and Balance). The ideal strategy is to have a nice middle ground of types and battle types, to overcome your enemies. Each hero also has a set of unique skills, which can inflict different status aliments on the enemy, ranging from Stun, which prevents them from attacking or moving the next turn. Damage over Time, which inflicts a set amount of damage over a couple of turns, and Charm which makes the enemy fight for you. This brings us into one of the biggest problems of the game.

The Random Number Generator.

I know it’s common for there to be RNG in a game such as this, but the game relies too much on this, to the point where a battle could be won or lost, depending on whether a hero gets charmed or not. Another problem is that for a game that encourages you to try out all the heroes, most players only end up using 5-10 heroes, due to their powerful abilities, leaving the remainder in the dust.

You can power up your heroes using equipment obtained from capsules, which can be bought using crystals, the games premium currency. Each piece of equipment has a couple of enchantments on it, including boosts to attack, defence, crit rate, and many more. The game can devolve into a mini Cold War, as players spend thousands of crystals, hoping to come across the pieces of equipment with the most powerful enchantments. Enhancing the equipment on the other hand, is an exercise in torture. By paying a set amount of gold, you can power up the base stats of the equipment. Naturally, the process gets more expensive as you upgrade your equipment. Keep in mind that the chances of success get lower as your piece reaches a higher rank, making it possible to waste 1-2 million gold on a single piece of equipment.

The PvP content is quite lacking. You have the Battle of Honor, a mode where you pit four of your heroes against another player and their team, all set on one of three boring maps. You have the Ice map, where the main fight takes place in the middle, which is quite cramped. The bridge map, which is an exercise in tedium, and the square map, where both players have their fourth hero close to the rest of the opponent’s team. Winning the battle earns you points, which determines your rank for the weekly leader board that hands out a set amount of Honor coins, depending on your position, which can then be spend of exclusive hero genes.

Speaking of hero genes, they are the main way to recruit heroes in the game. Most of them can be obtained by defeating them in their boss stage. However you can only play these stages, three times a day, unless you spend a few crystals. Despite the fact that there are double genes events that occur throughout the week, it tends to wear a person down, due to the sheer amount of grinding that goes into it. Once you have obtained your hero, you will then need to level them up until they reach their cap, where you then need to grind for rebirth golems to increase their rank. Repeat the process three more times, then proceed to do the same for the rest of the heroes. I understand that games such as this are destined to contain some grinding, but this is ridiculous. Adding to the grinding problem is the energy meter, one of the biggest plagues to have hit the IOS market. You’re expected to do a large amount of grinding with a meagre energy bar, and that’s if you even want to have a chance to compete with the top players.

Other:

Now we get onto how Nexon handle the support for the game. For the most part, they do a decent job, however they have stumbled a few times, none more infamous than the Noblesse controversy.

For those of you not in the loop, the Noblesse controversy revolves around a crossover event between FWT and Noblesse, a web comic that’s famous in South Korea. FTW had an event where you can unlock four characters from the web comic, within a set amount of time (these characters being Frankenstein, Muzaka, Raskreia, and Seira.) The first three could be obtained as normal, however Seira was locked behind a 100USD paywall, betraying the company’s claim of being able to obtain all the heroes, without paying a cent. Naturally, the news outraged everyone, causing them to leave one star reviews and delete the game from their device. Nexon apologised for the debacle, claiming that it “won’t happen again regarding the heroes they create” as well as promise “There will be more crossovers planned in the future.” Though whether they will repeat their mistake is up to debate.

Final Thoughts:

While the game is in no way a bad game, it is also not a good game. The story is clichéd, the gameplay, when not being grindy, relies more on luck than actual skill, and the character art is subpar. Considering the fact that the game is free, I recommend at least a download to try it out, otherwise this comment on the IOS store sums up the game perfectly.
How is this game in the app stores best new games? It’s just like every other tactics rpg!
My score: 5/10

AN: In the months following after the review was posted, Nexon fixed a lot of the problems that I initially had with the game. In it's current state, FWT gets an 8/10.
Jesus man what is up with you and all of those waifus! Are you secretly the "Ultimate Pimp"?
A quote from Project AFTER
Gorillagram only gets sexual stimulation from playing Pokemon Reborn and its derivatives.
A quote from Andrew himself

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GorillaGamer
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Re: Gorilla Reviews

Post by GorillaGamer » Fri Oct 06, 2017 12:06 am

Few video game franchises can claim to have as big an impact on media, as the Pokémon franchise does, and considering the high quality of the games, it’s understandable why Millions of people enjoy Pokémon games. Naturally, several game companies tried to cash in on the monster catching phenomenon, with varying results. However in 2012, a company known as NNT Resonant created an IOS game known as Dragon Island Blue that proved that the monster catching genre had a place on the App Store. It had its rough points, but it was still a quality game that entertained the masses. A year later, they released Hunter Island, a game that did what all good sequels should do, improve on the predecessors short comings and added to the roster. Like with Dragon Island, fans adored the game and got the company noticed. So in 2015, NNT Resonant decided to create a third game known as Neo Monsters, promising PVP content and a roster of 900 monsters. Naturally, that sounds great, but I’ll let you in on a secret…

Neo Monsters is bad

Mind-bogglingly bad.

The Pros:

I really like the massive increase in monsters that you can train, with special kudos going to their designs. You can easily tell that this is where the most amount of effort was put into the game, and it shows. Some notable designs include Viridizaurus, a Velociraptor adorned with leaves; Grimowl, a one-eyed owl with lighting powers; and The Godfeather, a penguin mafia don that has become the unofficial mascot of the entire Island franchise.

Another thing the game gets right is two new aspects of the battle system; the 16-monster limit, and the ‘chaser’ abilities. One of the flaws in the first two games it that you could have a maximum of 50 monsters on a team, making battles unnecessarily long. Neo monsters fixes that by giving you a smaller limit to your team capacity, encouraging the player to think carefully about what creatures to put on your team. The chaser abilities are moves that on their own, are quite weak. However, they deal massive damage to monsters affected by certain status conditions (I.e. Poison Eater deals critical damage to poisoned monsters.) These chaser abilities encourage the player to build entire teams based off of inflicting the conditions, and profiting off of them. Now that I’ve got the good out of the way, it’s time to talk about the bad parts of Neo Monsters.

The Cons:

One of the game’s biggest problems is how it handles IAPs. Now, I know that as a mobile game, you’re bound to run into IAPs. And yes, the first two games had them, but here’s the thing.

In those games, you could get all the monsters, be it by catching, training, or combining them without spending any extra money. The eggs that you buy with the premium currency in those games gave you powerful monsters, but you could still find them in the wild. Here in Neo Monsters, out of the 900 monsters in the game, only 200 could be found in the wild. Sure, the game gives you some free gems to buy a few eggs, but once you use those up, the only way to get more is to either wait for a special event that offers them as a prize, or spend some money. And they aren’t cheap either; $6 gets you 5 gems, just enough for a single egg that may or may not net you a powerful monster. And it gets worse; the most expensive IAP in the game is the 150 gem pack, going for $125. You could buy yourself a game or two for your console or PC, and I’ll guarantee you a much better time with those games, than had you bought the gems. The worst part is that some of the players DEFEND this choice, calling the critics “entitled little crybabies”. I ask you, what is so entitled about criticising a terrible decision in a game? And it’s not like the game is free either. The game itself costs a dollar to download, like with the other two games. Naturally, people complained, and what did the developers do? Well a few months ago, they released 62 more monsters, with around a quarter of them being able to be captured. The rest were throw in the egg roulette alongside the 700 other premium monsters. I’ve gone on about the IAPs enough, so it’s time to talk about some other major flaws.

I’ve spoken about the improvements in the battle mechanics, but now it’s time to talk about the negative parts about it, namely the point system. You see, alongside the 16 monster limit, there’s also a point system, where each monster is given a point score, ranging from 1 to 12. I honestly find the point system flawed, considering how we already have a team limit. It is easy to find yourself in a situation where you have around 3 monsters less than your opponents, due to you reaching the maximum amount of points for your team. You can increase the cap by progressing through the story and earned ranks in the online part of the game, so I’ll give the developers that.

Next, the story. While both Dragon Island and Hunter Island had meh stories, Neo Monsters has an absolutely trash story. I will admit that as an IOS game, it’s a bit unfair to expect a story on the levels of Metal Gear Solid and Fire Emblem, but I’d expected at least some effort put into the story. The gist of it is that you are the successor of a trainer known as Hector Finnegan, a champion trainer that supposedly assassinated the emperor a decade ago, causing irreversible damage to his name and his ranch. Since Hector was your uncle, you set off on a quest to clear his name and find out the truth. It wouldn’t surprise you that a story with the plot of a bad shonen anime will also have a cast of terrible characters. Your main rival Thale in particular, is some emo bastard who wants revenge on you, because his dad was a guard who had lost his reputation following the assassination. Keep in mind, you only learn about this past the halfway mark, way after Thale was first introduced. All the miserable bastard does is scowl at you and everyone else while constantly talking about revenge. He’s like Gary Oak from the Pokémon anime, only with all of his likable traits removed in favour of some emo’s backstory. The supporting cast is not much better; throughout the story you’ll meet and battle against several characters, who leave the story once you defeat them. They are so forgettable that I have trouble even recalling their names. Eventually the story takes a turn for the worse, as it adapts some pseudo-conspiracy bullshit involving the empress supposedly having an affair with Hector.

The graphics are hit and miss; while the monsters look great and the environments are for the most part, passable, the human sprites are absolutely atrocious. Characters look like they suffered from a stroke and have a few basic emotions, ranging from happy to sadness. However, the most common one your will see is an angry scowl (due to a previously mentioned rival). Both the sound design and the music sound incredibly stock, as if they were made in a simple program that cost them $50.

The difficulty scaling in Neo Monsters is off the charts. At the beginning of the game, it is very easy to defeat your opponents. But from the minute we are introduced to a certain emo character whom I already talked about, the game gets significant harder. From that point, your opponents will start packing several rare and powerful premium monsters that I assume sent them broke. It gets to the point where players delete the app and start from scratch, due to not having the monsters needed to defeat a powerful opponent. The worst part is that your opponents aren’t affected by the previously mentioned point system, making it cheaper than it already was. Now, I do like getting challenged in video games, but when the challenge comes from not having the specific monsters for the situation, due to the random nature of the egg roulette, then there is something wrong with your game.

Finally, we have the online aspect of the game. Neo Monsters introduced a series of dungeons that can only be accessed online. These dungeons can reward you with the necessary ingredients to have your premium monsters reach their final stage of evolution. I honestly find this system a lot more tedious than in the previous games, considering you only had to level them up in those games. It doesn’t help the fact that training has been made a lot more annoying in Neo Monsters. You see, as opposed to defeating monsters in the wild and earn experience, you play this stupid card mini game, where you select cards of varying levels (bronze, silver and gold), to power up various stats (Attack, Defence, HP and Speed). Once you’ve levelled up a monsters stats enough, they’ll evolve into the next stage, only for you to repeat the process until they are ready for their ultra-evolution. Alongside the ingredients, you’ll also need a lot of silver on the side; how do you get the ingredients and silver? By trekking through online dungeons and defeating the boss monsters. You open them with a gold key, which recharges at a rate of one every 24 hours. And as if it couldn’t get worse, you have to spend tickets, which are Neo Monsters answer to the energy meter that’s common place in shitty IOS games. It takes days just to get enough resources to ultra-evolve ONE monster; imagine repeating the process over TWO HUNDRED times, just to get the final evolutions, and that’s counting on the fact that you were able to get lucky with the eggs.

Conclusion:

I had high hopes for this game. Really high hopes. You would not believe how disappointed I was that a company that I had trusted, betrayed me by releasing this money-grubbing program, they call a game. Even if they fixed the micro-transactions, it still wouldn’t fix the ridiculous difficulty spike, the tedious process of evolving your monsters, and the terrible story. They say that ‘the third time’s the charm’, but with Neo Monsters, that just isn’t the case.

Oh, and one last thing. Thale can go die in a fire like the miserable bastard he is.

My Score: 2.5/10

AN: I really want to talk more about the game, since it's so fucking bad. Maybe I'll do a follow up review on it.
Jesus man what is up with you and all of those waifus! Are you secretly the "Ultimate Pimp"?
A quote from Project AFTER
Gorillagram only gets sexual stimulation from playing Pokemon Reborn and its derivatives.
A quote from Andrew himself

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Re: Gorilla Reviews

Post by GorillaGamer » Fri Oct 06, 2017 12:11 am

RPG’s are a fickle thing. On one hand, they can be some of the most amazing games of all time. Other times, they can be massive stinkers. I was curious as to how an RPG on an Apple device would play out. I then noticed a simple game, titled Dawn of Magic.

Image

The game was made by a simple game company from Hong Kong, known as Lakoo. The first warning siren went off in my mind, when I noticed that the game icon was that of an incredibly busty maid, with a small smile on her face. Not wanting to judge a book by its cover, or in this case, an app by its icon, I decided to download the game and give it a try…

Dawn of Magic is one of the cheapest, fucking games, I’ve ever played in my life.

It amazing, how little effort went into this game. And seeing as how Lakoo’s other game are of average to good quality, I want to know what the heck went wrong with this game.

Story:

The story of the game is that the magic in the world is suddenly running out, causing the townsfolk to panic. You play as Jack, a young warrior/blacksmith, whose family is one of the three guardian families, for some MacGuffin that is a key to the Holy Land, the source of the world’s magic. He is tasked by his father to investigate the disappearance of the magic, after their town is attacked by a bunch of vague, antagonistic villains. Along the way, he is joined by Bella, a talented magic user, and the youngest of the second guardian families. Lydia, a rich noble who’s the remaining guardian family. And Virginia, Lydia’s personal maid and who you see on the app icon. Along the way, you engage in battles against the foot soldiers of the villains who attacked Jack’s town. They are called, and I kid you not, the Illuminati. It is then revealed that the disappearing magic is a conspiracy concocted by the Archbishop, in an attempt to punish humanity for their over-reliance on magic.

It shouldn’t come as a surprise, but the story is nothing more than a series of clichés and plot conveniences, sprinkled with a side order of pointless characters, (A prime example being Louis, Lydia’s foreign fiancée). Now I don’t exactly expect the best of stories, from IOS games, but when your main villains are literally named ‘mysterious guy’ and ‘evil woman’, you’re obviously doing something wrong. But undoubtedly the worst part was the Archbishops reveal as the main antagonist, spouting the same, misanthropic bullshit about how ‘humans are greedy’ and ‘they’ll destroy the world’ that’s been cropping up in games lately.

Art/Sound:

The only good thing I will say about the game, is that the character designs, for the most part, are pretty to look at, with special mention going to the three heroines. While the designs are by no means original, (Jack looks like a typical shonen protagonist) at least some genuine effort was put into them. The heroines, though nothing special again, look pretty darn great, with my favourite being Virginia, due to the fact that I have a thing for pretty maids.

The environments however, are quite bland to look at. A good chunk of the locations are either empty fields, or dark caves. The only noteworthy environment was the Holy Land, and that was at the very end of the game. The backgrounds for the battles are also bland; in most of them, there’s this castle that doesn’t even appear in the game, and it appears everywhere, except for in the caves, and the Holy Land.
The sound in the game is incredibly cheap. Between sound effects that sound like they were ripped from an online sound site, and stock musical tracks, the game gives of a vibe that the developers have little to no budget.

Gameplay:

Now we get into the miniscule meat of the game. And when I say miniscule, I really mean it. The combat is standard RPG fare; you have a main attack that’s free to use, magic that requires the hero to be equipped with magic gems, powerful attacks that use up AP (Action Points), healing/battle items that can be used in battle, as well as a powerful death spell that halves the HP of all enemies in battle, for 3,000 gold. The problem?

The game requires ridiculous amounts of grinding.

I know that grinding is inevitable in an RPG, but when each battle rewards you with very little gold, you are forced to either spend hours grinding, or you can buy gold for real cash, because of course Dawn of Magic had to go down that path. There are some side quests that require you to get a set amount of monster parts, in exchange for a rare gem, but the drop rare is so low, you’re better off buying the gem. The fights against the various monsters are incredibly repetitive, on top of the slogfest, as they always use the same tactics, and can be exploited very easily. Bosses on the other hand, are cheap to the point where they can become a nightmare. I understand that the developers wanted to challenge us, but having the bosses be immune to status conditions greatly tips the scales against us.

Even outside the battles, the gameplay is shallow. The few towns you enter are devoid of life, with the exception of the shops, a few quest locations, and a couple of side quests. I kid you not, when I say that unless you activate the D-Pad in the Options menu, it is impossible to move your character properly. How bad is your game, when even something as simple as having your character walk, is a hassle? One odd decision on the developers part, is that you must have Jack in your current party, at all times, meaning that one of the heroines is forced to sit outside of battle. I don’t care about the Zac Efron wannabe, I just want to play as the heroines. Of course, this means that Jack would become ludicrously overpowered. The worst part is if you take out all of the grinding, the game’s pathetically short for an IOS game. I managed to complete it in 8 hours, more than half of it was spend on tedious grinding.

One last thing I want to say before ending the review is that the game promises multiple endings, involving Jack getting paired up with whatever heroine he’s most compatible with. You see, throughout the story, you are presented with three options on what to say, and whichever one you pick will effect Jack’s relationship with Bella, Lydia and Virginia. Of course, the game doesn’t tell us, which option goes with which heroine, meaning you are left with no idea what ending you’re going to get, until you actually reach the end of the game. Keep in mind, you could be going down one ending, only to pick an option and get stuck with another ending. Don’t be surprised when you’re working to get Lydia’s ending, only to get given Bella’s ending all of a sudden. While multiple endings do sound like an incentive for multiple play throughs, the monotonous gameplay and cliché riddled story will most likely ward off anyone from attempting to play it again.

Conclusion:

Dawn of Magic, to put it bluntly, is a bad game. While nowhere near as loathsome as Fantasy War Tactics, it is not worth your time and money. If you really want to play an RPG on IOS, try downloading one or two of the Zenonia games. They are a much better way to spend your time, than Dawn of Magic.

Pros:

The three heroines are admittedly attractive. (Virginia is best waifu)

Cons:

Dull, clichéd story.

Monotonous, grind-filled gameplay.

Cheap, money-grabbing tactics.

Final score: 2/10


AN: Yeah...this was written back then I was a waifu-obsessed creep. Thank god I managed to get it all out of my system.
Jesus man what is up with you and all of those waifus! Are you secretly the "Ultimate Pimp"?
A quote from Project AFTER
Gorillagram only gets sexual stimulation from playing Pokemon Reborn and its derivatives.
A quote from Andrew himself

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Gorilla Reviews

Post by Ensulge » Thu Jul 11, 2019 4:11 pm

They often give away goodies in return for reviews.

This month, and for the second time, they are offering the chance of winning a Robert Lane PCP Regulator worth ВЈ84.95.

I have invited the owner of the site to join this forum.

Kind regards,



Phil

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